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Badges of Apple Computer employees in 1983.

The following is a list of early employees from Apple Computer Inc., the predecessor of Apple Inc. that was incorporated on January 3, 1977.

Some of the earliest staff had been working at the home of co-founder Steve Jobs' parents since the previous Apple Computer Company partnership was formed on April 1, 1976. The first eight badges were assigned in March 1977 by Michael Scott, Apple's first president, so the numbers may not reflect the order in which these early staff joined the company.[1][2][3][4] Employees who left Apple and returned are known to have been re-issued their previous badge number.[5][6]

List of employees by badge number

  Still with Apple    Early "garage" staff 
Badge
no.
Badge/hire
date
Name Description / note
—  1976-04-01 Ronald Wayne Part of the original Apple Computer Company, but left the partnership 12 days later.
—  1976-05 Patty Jobs First part-time employee. Helped assemble Apple-1 circuit boards at the Jobs family home.
1977-03 Steve Wozniak Co-founder and technical lead behind the Apple-1, Apple II, and Disk II.
1977-03 Steve Jobs Michael Scott assigned Jobs this number to annoy him. Jobs later assigned himself "#0".
1977-03 Mike Markkula Angel investor who provided $250,000 to build the Apple II and recruited Michael Scott.
1977-03 Bill Fernandez One of Apple's first "garage" employees, worked with Wozniak on the Apple I and II.
1977-03 Rod Holt Apple's first chief engineer. This slot was first offered to Jerry Manock, who initially declined.
1977-03 Randy Wigginton Circuit designer who adapted Microsoft's BASIC into Applesoft BASIC and wrote MacWrite.
1977-03 Michael Scott Scott assigned himself this number as a reference to James Bond "007".
1977-03-17 Chris Espinosa Early employee who could have received a lower number, but got back late from school.
1977 Sherry Livingston Apple's first secretary.
10  1977-06 Gary Martin Apple's first in-house accountant, later also identified as employee #17.
11  1977-06 Don Breuner Hardware technician who later co-developed MacWrite.
12  1977-06 Dan Kottke Early "garage" employee, but received this number after returning from Columbia College.
? Mark Stephens A.k.a. "Robert X. Cringely", author of Accidental Empires.[7]
13  ? John Draper A.k.a. "Captain Crunch", designed early modem boards and wrote EasyWriter for the Apple II.
1977-06 Mark Johnson Also claims to be employee #13, confirmed to have assembled Apple II computers.
14  1977 Gene Carter Director of sales, recruited by Mike Markkula.
? Mike Wagner Also claims to be employee #14.[8]
15  1977 Thomas Whitney Executive vice president of engineering.
16  1977-08 Wendell Sander Staff scientist. Father of the Apple III.
17  1977-09 Gary Martin Apple's first corporate controller, previously also identified as employee #10.
? Gary Shannon Employee number guessed by relatives.[9]
21  1977 Robert Martinengo Assembled Apple II computers.
25  1977-11-14 Dick Huston Wrote the boot ROM of the original Disk II floppy drive for the Apple II.
27  1977-11-28 Cliff Huston Designed the analog board of the original Disk II floppy drive for the Apple II.
29  Ed Ruder Collaborated with Wigginton and Breuner in developing MacWrite.
31  1978-01-03 Jef Raskin Co-wrote the Integer BASIC manual as a consultant. Started the Macintosh project in 1979.
32  1978-01 Brian Howard Co-wrote the Integer BASIC manual as a consultant. 2nd member of the Macintosh project.
34  1978 Elmer Baum Early manager, loaned Jobs and Wozniak $5,000 in seed money to build the Apple I.
36  1978 Phil Roybal Built the product marketing and tech support departments.
49  1978 Bana Witt Personal assistant to Jef Raskin. Badge issued December 13.
51  1978-04-27 Bill Atkinson Architect of QuickDraw, MacPaint and HyperCard. Blue badge issued December 13.
63  1978 Brad Hacker Worked on user manuals and documentation. Badge issued June 16, 1980.
66  1978 Bruce Tognazzini Applications software engineer and human interface designer.
128  1978 Kent Hopkins Worked in the production department.
136  1978-10 Cheng Lim Worked in the production department; trained to assemble keyboards.
140  1978-10 Terri Powers Hired on the same day as Cheng; later became Apple's first tech trainee in 1980.
187  1978-12 Bob Bishop Programmer of the Apple-Vision demo.
246  1979 Jerry Manock Industrial designer of the Apple II, III, Lisa, and Macintosh 128K cases.
282  1979-02-27 Burrell Smith Designer of the Macintosh 128K logic board.
320  1979 Rich Whicker Member of the "Twiggy" team.
345  1979-04-30 Joe Shelton Marketing analyst and product manager.
350  1979 Laszlo Zsidek Tooling and manufacturing engineer.
435  1979-08-06 Andy Hertzfeld Software architect of the Macintosh operating system.
1111  1980-02-01 Ann Bowers Apple's first vice president of human resources.
1926  1981-02 Tom Pittard Senior research engineer in the Apple Advanced Technology Group.
2384  1981-05-25 Joe Budge Secretary of the International Apple Core.
2536  1981 Bryan Stearns Worked on TeachText and MacBASIC. Left in fall 1982 and returned in January 1985.
2632  1981-08-10 Mark Gitschel Worked at the Macintosh factory in Fremont, California.
3039  1981-11-10 Ellen Petry Leanse Member of the Macintosh launch team and first "User Evangelist".
3978  1982 Susan Kare Original Macintosh user interface graphics and icon designer.
3??2  1983-04-20 Martin J. Spergel Identified as a "Consultant (Friend)"; possible typo on badge numbered as "3.2"?[2]
4115  1983-02-14 Mimi Filizetti Marketing communications.
8276  1986-03-10 Christine Thompson Corporate marketing executive for small business.

  * Italicization indicates anecdotal entries with conflicting or no corroborating infomation.

Gallery

References

  1. The First 10 Apple Employees: Where Are They Now? by Jay Yarow, Business Insider. 2011-05-24.
  2. 2.0 2.1 Who were the first 25 employees at Apple? by Sean Owczarek, Quora. 2012-09-24.
  3. Who were the first 250 employees of Apple? by Terri Powers, Quora. 2012-07-25.
  4. Mac 30th Celebration by All Planet Studios, The Computer History Museum, and Macworld/iWorld. 2014-01-25.
  5. Mac Turns 30 and We Celebrate Redux, ilenes machine. 2014-01-27.
  6. MacBasic by Andy Hertzfeld, Folklore. 1985-06.
  7. Q & A with Bob Cringely p.3, PBS. 1996-06.
  8. Speaking of Apples by Dennis McClain-Furmaski, The Road Apple vol.2, #5. 1989.
  9. Oral History of Kathleen and Dan Spracklen by Gardner Hendrie, Computer History Museum. 2005-03-02.

See also

External links

Articles

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