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PC Card (formerly PCMCIA card) was a 16-bit peripheral interface standard used by early mobile devices. The specifications for PC Cards and its successor, CardBus, were developed by the Personal Computer Memory Card International Association (PCMCIA).

History[]

PCMCIA cards were originally designed for memory-expansion cards for data storage, based on development by the Japan Electronic Industries Development Association (JEIDA).[1] Because PC Cards were based on the 16-bit ISA data bus standard, they also supported a range of other devices, such as hard drives, modems, and network cards. These were superseded by CardBus, based on the 32-bit PCI bus.[2]

Types[]

Card types specify only the physical thicknesses of the card.[1]

  • Type I: 3.3 mm (0.13 inch) thick
  • Type II: 5.0 mm (0.20 inch) thick
  • Type III: 10.5 mm (0.41 inch) thick
  • Type IV: 16 mm (0.63 inch) thick, not officially standardized and only supported by Toshiba
  • CompactFlash: A subset of the PCMCIA standard that used 50 of the 68 pins to support the IDE interface. CF Type I adapters allowed smaller CF cards to be accepted in a PC Card slot.[3]

Releases[]

  • PCMCIA Standard Release 1.0/JEIDA 4.0 - June 1990, based on the form factor used by the Neo Geo game system, supported Type I and II sizes.
  • PCMCIA Standard Release 2.0/JEIDA 4.1 - September 1991
  • PCMCIA Standard Release 2.01 - November 1992, added the Type III form factor.
  • PCMCIA Standard Release 2.1/JEIDA 4.2 - July 1993
  • PC Card Standard Release 5.0 - February 1995, introduced the CardBus standard.
  • PC Card Standard 5.01 Update - March 1995
  • PC Card Standard 5.02 Update - May 1995
  • PC Card Standard 5.03 Update - November 1995
  • PC Card Standard 5.04 Update - March 1996
  • PC Card Standard Release 6.0 - March 1997
  • PC Card Standard 6.1 Update - April 1998
  • PC Card Standard 7.0 Release - February 1999
  • PC Card Standard 7.1 Update - March 2000
  • PC Card Standard 7.2 Update - November 2000
  • PC Card Standard 8.0 Release - April 2001, introduced the CardBay standard.

Apple models with PC Card support[]

Some newer Apple models supported CardBus, which were backwards compatible with PC Cards.[2]

References[]

  1. 1.0 1.1 PC Card Technology Primer, The Worldwide Organization for Modular Peripherals. Archived 1999-08-27.
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 PowerBooks with CardBus Support by Daniel Knight, Low End Mac. 2018-04-03.
  3. PC Card Primer, The Official PCMCIA Association website. Archived 2010-02-04.

See also[]

External links[]

Articles[]

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